20th International Conference on Web Information Systems Engineering (WISE 2019)
26-30 November 2019
Hong Kong (and Macau), China
Keynote Speakers

Mohamed Mokbel, Qatar Computing Research Institute & University of Minnesota

  • Thinking Spatial
  • Abstract
    The need to manage and analyze spatial data is hampered by the lack of specialized systems to support such data. System builders mostly build general-purpose systems that are generic enough to handle any kind of attributes. Whenever there is a pressing need for spatial data support, it is considered as an afterthought problem that can be addressed by adding new data types, extensions, or spatial cartridges to existing systems. This talk advocates for dealing with spatial data as first class citizens, and for always thinking spatially whenever it comes to system design. This is well justified by the proliferation of location-based applications that are mainly relying on spatial data. The talk will go through various system designs and show how they would be different if we have designed them while thinking spatially. Examples of these systems include data base systems, big data systems, machine learning, recommender systems, and social networks.
  • Biography
    Mohamed Mokbel (PhD, Purdue University, MSc, BSc, Alexandria University) is Chief Scientist at Qatar Computing Research Institute and a Professor at University of Minnesota. His current research interests focus on systems and machine learning techniques for big spatial data and applications. Mohamed is an ACM Distinguished Scientist. His research work has been recognized by the VLDB 10-years Best Paper Award, four conference Best Paper Awards, and the NSF CAREER Award. Mohamed is the past elected Chair of ACM SIGPATIAL, current Editor-in-Chief for Distributed and Parallel Databases Journal, and on the editorial board of ACM Books, ACM TODS, VLDB Journal, ACM TSAS, and GoeInformatica journals. He has also served as PC Vice Chair of ACM SIGMOD and PC Co-Chair for ACM SIGSPATIAL and IEEE MDM.

Wei Zhao, American University of Sharjah, UAE

  • Future of Computing
  • Abstract
    In this talk, we examine potential developments in the field of computing. Recall that Computer Science is defined as the science of algorithms. The development of computer science and its applications have relied on two cornerstones: Mathematical logic and semiconductor technology. Computing, i.e., execution of an algorithm, is a process of evaluating a logical expression; by the principles of mathematical logic, all logical expression is a combination of simple logical operations, namely, "and", "or", and "not". Thanks to semiconductor technology, these logical operations can be implemented in a substantial manner with high density, high reliability, and low cost. Based on these two cornerstones, the complexity theory has been the major theoretical development of Computer Science. According to this theory, computing problems can be classified as "easy" and "hard". Easy ones are those in which the computation time is bounded by a polynomial of input size. The majority of computing applications today are in this category. In the future, we must focus on hard problems. One approach is to use non-semiconductor-based physical devices; initial work in quantum computers would fall within this category. Another approach is to develop heuristic algorithms with much lower complexity; this is very much an objective of "Artificial Intelligence" development. The third approach is to leverage properties inherently located within input data, hence improving the computation efficiency.
  • Biography
    An internationally renowned scholar, Professor Wei Zhao is currently serving the American University of Sharjah as its Chief Research Officer. From 2008 to 2018, he served as the eighth Rector (i.e., President) of the University of Macau. Professor Zhao also served as the Dean of the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Director for the Division of Computer and Network Systems in the U.S. National Science Foundation, and Senior Associate Vice President for Research at Texas A&M University. Professor Zhao completed his undergraduate studies in Physics at Shaanxi Normal University, China, in 1977, and received his MSc and PhD degrees in Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1983 and 1986, respectively.

    An IEEE Fellow, Professor Zhao has made significant contributions in cyber-physical system, distributed computing, real-time systems, computer networks, and cyberspace security. He led the effort to define research agenda of and to create the very first funding program for cyber-physical systems, when he served as the NSF CNS Division Director in 2006. His research group has received numerous awards. Their research results have been adopted in the standard of SAFENET (Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Embedded Network). In 2011, he was named by the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology as the Chief Scientist of the national 973 Internet of Things Project. Professor Zhao was awarded the Lifelong Achievement Award by the Oversea Chinese Association of Science and Technology in 2005. In 2007, he was honored with the Overseas Achievement Award by the Chinese Computer Federation. Professor Zhao has been conferred honorable doctorates by 12 universities in the world and academician of the International Eurasian Academy of Sciences.

Sponsors

Springer

HP

HP

HP